If I Lived My Life Again in The Strand Magazine, March 1931. P. G. Wodehouse Winston S. Churchill.
If I Lived My Life Again in The Strand Magazine, March 1931
If I Lived My Life Again in The Strand Magazine, March 1931
If I Lived My Life Again in The Strand Magazine, March 1931
If I Lived My Life Again in The Strand Magazine, March 1931

If I Lived My Life Again in The Strand Magazine, March 1931

London: George Newnes, Ltd., 1931. First edition. Periodical. This March, 1931 issue of The Strand Magazine (Vol. LXXXI, No. 483) contains the first appearance of Winston Churchill’s essay “If I Lived My Life Again”, published prior to its inclusion in Thoughts and Adventures. In this article - part time travel thought experiment and part reminiscence on his early career – Churchill asks himself what changes he would make in life, what mistakes he would avoid and which other paths to pursue, were he given a second chance. The elephant in the room is the mistake that nearly ruined his political career, the disaster in the Dardanelles. During the First World War, Churchill remarkably served both in the Cabinet and on the front, nearly losing his political life in the former and his corporeal life in the latter. Churchill was First Lord of the Admiralty from 1911 until 1915, but was scapegoated for the Dardanelles tragedy and the slaughter at Gallipoli and forced to resign. He served part of his political exile on the Front, as a Lt. Colonel in the trenches. By the war's end, he was exonerated and rejoined the Government. Nonetheless, the stigma of the Dardanelles lingered and the political exile and near-ruin of his political career presaged his experience in the “wilderness years” of the 1930s in which he found himself at the time of this article’s writing. Here Churchill refuses to comfort himself with alternative histories. “Perhaps it would have been better, perhaps it would have been worse. Imagination bifurcates and loses itself along the ever-multiplying paths of the labyrinth.” Additionally, he defends himself by reminding the reader “it must not be forgotten that the land attack upon the Gallipoli Peninsula, costly and unsuccessful as it was, played a great part in bringing Italy into the war in the nick of time, kept Bulgaria in awed suspense through the summer of 1915, and before it was finished broke the heart of the Turkish army.” Despite his exoneration Churchill clearly still felt the weight; his tone is decidedly defensive. This article fills pages 243-51 and is illustrated by drawings depicting scenes described including Gallipoli and Churchill’s time in the Boer War. This magazine is in good plus condition, particularly considering the inherent fragility of the format. The covers, which prominently feature Churchill’s name in a red box on the front, are bright, complete, and firmly attached, with only minor wear and soiling. The spine is complete and fully legible with some wear overall and tattering at the head and foot. The contents are complete, clean, and bright with no markings or spotting. This article was reprinted for America the following month in Collier’s and later collected as the first essay in 1932’s Thoughts and Adventures under the title “A Second Choice”. Bibliographic reference: Cohen C347a, Woods C163. Item #005051

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