An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 21 September 1943, on the way to address Parliament having just returned to London the evening prior from his first Quebec conference with President Roosevelt
An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 21 September 1943, on the way to address Parliament having just returned to London the evening prior from his first Quebec conference with President Roosevelt

An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 21 September 1943, on the way to address Parliament having just returned to London the evening prior from his first Quebec conference with President Roosevelt

London: The Associated Press, 21 September 1943. Photograph. This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill on 21 September 1943, on the way to address Parliament after returning from his first Quebec conference with President Roosevelt. The gelatin silver print on matte photo paper measures 10 x 5.125 inches (25.4 x 13 cm). Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing with some light edge wear confined to the margins, some creasing to the corners, and a short, closed tear to the lower edge. This photograph once belonged to the working archive of The Daily Telegraph. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “The Associated Press”, a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph dated 23 SEP 1943, and a typed caption titled “PREMIER GOES BEFORE COMMONS” and reading, “MR. CHURCHILL’S STATEMENT IN THE COMMONS, TODAY, SEPT. 21, ON THE WAR SITUATION WILL BE THE LONGEST HE HAS MADE AS PREMIER, IT IS BELEIVED [sic]. IT IS EXPECTED TO TAKE TWO HOURS TO DELIVER. THE PRIME MINISTER WILL REVIEW MILITARY AND POLITICAL EVENTS OF RECENT WEEKS AND HE IS EXPECTED TO OUTLINE HIS RECENT TALKS WITH PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT. ASSOCIATE PRESS PHOTO SHOWS: THE PREMIER LEAVING FOR THE HOUSE.” Churchill’s first Quebec conference with Roosevelt in August 1943 was code-named “Quadrant”. Churchill was accompanied by his wife, daughter Mary, and a “formidable team” of two hundred, most of whom set sail aboard the Queen Mary in the afternoon of 5 August. (Foreign Minister Anthony Eden and Minister of Information Brendan Bracken arrived later via plane.) En route, Churchill and his Chiefs of Staff discussed every aspect of the war, including the twice-postponed and much awaited cross-Channel invasion, “Overlord”. “It was Churchill’s first opportunity… to learn from his advisers the full details of the ‘Overlord’ plan…” (Gilbert, VII, p.462) Reaching the port of Halifax in the afternoon of 9 August, Churchill travelled by train to Quebec, which he reached on the evening of 10 August. While in Quebec, Churchill and Roosevelt both lived at the Citadel, the summer residence of the Governor-General, the upstairs floor of which was prepared for Roosevelt “with ramps fitted wherever necessary for his wheelchair.” (Gilbert, Vol. VII, p.468) Churchill’s and Roosevelt’s discussions at both Hyde Park, President Roosevelt’s home on the Hudson River (12-14 August) and in Quebec (17-24 August), included the recent overthrow of Mussolini and battle to subjugate Italy, command of the forthcoming cross-Channel invasion (Churchill conceded to FDR’s choice of Eisenhower, passing over Brooke, to whom command had already been promised), command in South-East Asia, sharing of information on development of the atomic bomb, and relations with Stalin. Churchill had just returned to London the evening before this image was taken. His 21 September speech to the House of Commons was “an account of his journeyings and of the recent developments in each of the war zones.” (Gilbert, Vol. VII, p.509) Of a rhetorical flourish about Italy in Churchill’s speech, Harold Nicolson wrote to his sons: “It is in this that one finds his mastery of the House. It is the combination of great flights of oratory with sudden swoops into the intimate and conversational. Of all his devices it is the one that never fails.” (Letter to Ben and Nigel Nicolson, 21 September 1943) During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives, physical copies of all photographs published or deemed of potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions, the surfaces of these photographs often hand-edited with brush, paint, pencil, and marker before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. Item #005197

Price: $180.00