An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill inspecting a Canadian guard of honour outside the Parliament buildings in Ottawa on 31 December 1941, the day after his famous "Some Chicken, Some Neck" address to the Canadian Parliament
An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill inspecting a Canadian guard of honour outside the Parliament buildings in Ottawa on 31 December 1941, the day after his famous "Some Chicken, Some Neck" address to the Canadian Parliament

An original wartime press photograph of Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill inspecting a Canadian guard of honour outside the Parliament buildings in Ottawa on 31 December 1941, the day after his famous "Some Chicken, Some Neck" address to the Canadian Parliament

London: British Official Photograph issued by Photographic News Agencies, Ltd., 7 January 1942. Photograph. This original press photograph captures Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill as he inspects a guard of honour outside the Canadian Parliament buildings in Ottawa on 31 December 1941, the day after his famous “Some chicken, some neck” address to the Canadian Parliament. The gelatin silver print on glossy photo paper measures 8 x 10 inches (20.3 x 25.4 cm). Condition is good plus. Most of the considerable edge wear is confined to the generous margins. Additionally, there are two pin holes in the left margin, some minor soiling, and light scuffing visible only under raking light. This photograph features original hand-applied retouching to Churchill’s face and hands. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Photographic News Agencies, Ltd.” and indicates that this is a “British Official Photograph”. Also present are a received stamp dated 7 JAN 1942, handwritten notations, and a clipping of the caption as it was published reading, “Mr. Churchill at Ottawa for his great speech to the Dominion. He is seen inspecting a guard of honour outside the Parliament buildings.” This photograph was captured on 31 December 1941 in Ottawa, Canada. In the days after the 7 December 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States formally entered the Second World War, marking the end of Britain's solitary stand against Hitler's Germany, which it had sustained since the fall of France. Immediately after Pearl Harbor, Churchill decided to travel to North America – a perilous journey he made by battleship at a time when German U-Boats plagued the North Atlantic. On 26 December 1941 Churchill addressed a joint session of the U.S. Congress. A few days later, on 30 December, he addressed both houses of the Canadian Parliament. In what became a defining line of the speech, Churchill was characteristically defiant: "When I warned them that Britain would fight alone whatever they did, their generals told their Prime Minister and his divided Cabinet 'In three weeks England will have her neck wrung like a chicken.’ Some chicken; some neck." Churchill expressed his admiration for the Canadian people and his thanks for their part in the war effort and gave a Churchillian exhortation to courage: “There shall be no halting, or half measures, there shall be no compromise, or parley. These gangs of bandits have sought to darken the light of the world; have sought to stand between the common people of all the lands and their march forward into their inheritance.” In recognition of French-speaking Canadians, Churchill delivered a section of this speech in French. This speech appears to have been well-received. One newspaper said that it had “the splendor of poetry at its best, and in phrases which had a Shakespearian glow and the fervor of the Bible, Britain’s ‘man of destiny’ electrified a joint session of the Senate and the House of Commons.” (Globe and Mail, 31 December 1941) Immediately after Churchill’s speech, Churchill had been ushered to the Speaker's Chamber where a young Yousef Karsh captured the iconic “Roaring Lion” portrait of Churchill. The following day, 31 December, Churchill gave a press conference before or after which this photograph was likely taken. This press photo originated with the Photographic News Agency, Ltd. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives, physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. Item #005228

Price: $200.00