An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill "smoking the inevitable cigar" on 23 December 1960 as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home to spend the holidays at Chartwell
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill "smoking the inevitable cigar" on 23 December 1960 as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home to spend the holidays at Chartwell

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill "smoking the inevitable cigar" on 23 December 1960 as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home to spend the holidays at Chartwell

London: Associated Press Ltd., 24 December 1960. Photograph. This is an original press photo of Winston S. Churchill smoking a cigar outside of his Hyde Park Gate home on 23 December 1960. This image measures 11.25 x 8.5 in (28.6 x 21.6 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is clean and free of scuffing with only minor edge wear, soft corners, and original crop markings. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of Churchill’s face and clothes, and a photographer in the background has been airbrushed out. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Associated Press Ltd.”, a published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 24 December 1960, a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper, and handwritten printing notations. The published caption for his photograph reads in full "Sir Winston Churchill walking with the aid of a stick, and smoking the inevitable cigar, as he left his home in Hyde Park Gate yesterday to spend Christmas at Chartwell." Now 86, “Churchill spent Christmas 1960 and the New Year of 1961 at Chartwell.” (Gilbert, VIII, p.1318). Chartwell had been the Churchills' home since 1922. “Perhaps no physical place - not Blenheim Palace where Churchill was born, the Houses of Parliament where he served for six decades, 10 Downing Street where he twice resided as Prime Minister, or St. Paul's Cathedral where his Queen and leaders from around the world mourned his death - would more deeply affect Churchill's life and legacy." (Gilbert, A Life, p.450) At Chartwell, Churchill was by turns father, husband, painter, landscaper, and bricklayer and work on improving the house and gardens continued for much of Churchill’s life. Chartwell would prove Churchill’s vital sanctuary during the “wilderness years” of the 1930s. And of course Chartwell served Churchill as “my factory” as he turned out an incredible volume of writing. Even during the darkest days of the Second World War, Chartwell was a place of refuge and renewal. After the Second World War, Churchill feared his income was insufficient to maintain Chartwell. Churchill's friend, Lord Camrose, assembled a consortium of 17 benefactors to buy Chartwell for the considerable sum of £50,000 and allowed Churchill to reside there for the rest of his life for a nominal rent of £350 a year, on his death for the property to be given to the National Trust as a permanent memorial. Churchill would not leave Chartwell for the final time until mid-October 1964. True to the intentions of Lord Camrose, Chartwell, with its more than 80 acres of woodland and farmland, remains a National Trust property, full of Churchill’s paintings and belongings, inhabited by his memory and spirit. This press photo once belonged to The Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. Winston S. Churchill was 80 years old when he resigned his second and final premiership on 5 April 1955. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served. Churchill's state funeral little more than four years after this photograph was taken was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral. Item #005386

Price: $50.00

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