An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill, with walking stick and inevitable cigar, leaving his Hyde Park Gate home on 17 April 1961 to attend the Chancellor of the Exchequer's Budget Day speech in the House of Commons
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill, with walking stick and inevitable cigar, leaving his Hyde Park Gate home on 17 April 1961 to attend the Chancellor of the Exchequer's Budget Day speech in the House of Commons

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill, with walking stick and inevitable cigar, leaving his Hyde Park Gate home on 17 April 1961 to attend the Chancellor of the Exchequer's Budget Day speech in the House of Commons

Sport & General Press Agency Ltd., 18 April 1961. Photograph. This is an original press photograph of Sir Winston S. Churchill, with walking stick and inevitable cigar, as he leaves his Hyde Park Gate home on 17 April 1961 to attend the Chancellor’s Budget Day speech in the House of Commons. Churchill had just recently returned to London, on the evening of 14 April, having flown from New York where he had disembarked after a voyage up the Atlantic coast on the Christina, the yacht of his friend, the Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis. Interestingly, just before Churchill left New York President Kennedy had phoned to ask “if Churchill would like to fly down to Washington in the Presidential aeroplane ‘and spend a couple of days with me.’” Churchill’s secretary, Montague Brown, declined on grounds that Churchill “could no longer undertake such a journey.” (Gilbert, VIII, pp.1322-23) In 1963 President Kennedy would issue the proclamation that made Churchill an Honorary Citizen of the United States. In 1968 Aristotle Onassis would marry President Kennedy’s widow. This image measures 10 x 8 in (26 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing with only minor edge wear, original crop marks, and a .5 inch crease perpendicular to the bottom edge. This image features original, hand-applied retouching of Churchill’s face and clothes. The verso features the copyright stamp “Sport & General Press Agency Ltd.”, a published stamp of The Daily Telegraph from 18 April 1961, a clipping of the caption as it was printed in the newspaper, and handwritten printing notations. Both Churchill and his father, Randolph, had served in the British Cabinet as Chancellor of the Exchequer, Lord Randolph in 1886, Sir Winston from 1924 to 1929. Six years before this photograph was taken, on 5 April 1955, Churchill had resigned his second and final premiership at the age of 80. During the final decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served.  The day after Churchill died, on 25 January 1965, the Queen sent a message to Parliament announcing: "Confident in the support of Parliament for the due acknowledgement of our debt of gratitude and in thanksgiving for the life and example of a national hero" and concluded "I have directed that Sir Winston's body shall lie in State in Westminster Hall and that thereafter the funeral service shall be held in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul.”  Churchill's state funeral was attended by the Queen herself, other members of the royal family, the Prime Minister, Harold Wilson, and representatives of 112 countries. It was the first time in a century that a British monarch attended a commoner’s funeral. This press photo once belonged to The Daily Telegraph’s working archive. During the first half of the twentieth century, photojournalism grew as a practice, fundamentally changing the way the public interacted with current events. Newspapers assembled expansive archives, including physical copies of all photographs published or deemed useful for potential future use, their versos typically marked with ink stamps and notes providing provenance and captions. Photo departments would often take brush, paint, pencil, and marker to the surface of photographs themselves to edit them before publication. Today these photographs exist as repositories of historical memory, technological artifacts, and often striking pieces of vernacular art. Item #005399

Price: $65.00

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