An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Lady Clementine Churchill taken at London Airport on 11 September 1958, the day before their golden wedding anniversary; they were departing for the South of France, where they would celebrate with no press interviews or public ceremony
An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Lady Clementine Churchill taken at London Airport on 11 September 1958, the day before their golden wedding anniversary; they were departing for the South of France, where they would celebrate with no press interviews or public ceremony

An original press photo of Sir Winston S. Churchill and Lady Clementine Churchill taken at London Airport on 11 September 1958, the day before their golden wedding anniversary; they were departing for the South of France, where they would celebrate with no press interviews or public ceremony

London: Central Press Photos Ltd., September 1958. Photograph. This is an original press photo of Sir Winston and Lady Churchill taken at London Airport on 11 September 1958 as the left for the South of France, where they celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. This press photo once belonged to The Daily Telegraph’s working archive. The image measures 10 x 8 in (25.4 x 20.3 cm) on matte photo paper. Condition is very good. The paper is crisp, clean, and free of scuffing with only some light bruising to the corners and an ink splotch along the upper edge. The image is crisp and clear with high contrast. The verso bears the copyright stamp of “Central Press Photos Ltd.”, a received stamp of The Daily Telegraph from September 1958, and a typed caption. The caption is titled “THE CHURCHILLS CELEBRATE GOLDEN WEDDING TOMORROW” and reads “11.9.58. A picture from the stock of SIR WINSTON & LADY CHURCHILL at London Airport just before they left for the South of France, where they are now, and where they will celebrate their Golden Wedding Anniversary Tomorrow, Friday.” The Churchills celebrated at La Capponcina, their old friend Max Beaverbrook’s villa at Cap-d’Ail. Their four living children gave them the gift of an avenue of golden roses in the Chartwell garden. Accompanying this gift was an illuminated vellum book containing a watercolor of each of the 28 varieties of roses to be planted, each executed by a different British artist. (Gilbert, VIII, p.1276) Clementine Churchill, nee Clementine Hozier, first met Winston at a ball in 1904, where he made a poor impression. In March 1908 she was placed next to Winston at a dinner party, where he apparently made a better impression; they married on 12 September 1908. Their marriage brought five children: Diana (b. 1909); Randolph (b. 1911); Sarah (b. 1914); Marigold (b. 1918); and Mary (b. 1922). To their lifelong marriage Clementine brought "a shrewd political intelligence. She supplied balance to Churchill at two levels: her more equable nature ensured that she moderated the depth of his depressions, and her good judgment helped to ward off political mistakes." (ODNB) Winston Churchill's life and career were tumultuous and relentlessly eventful, so Clementine's married life was perhaps inherently not without stress, challenges, and sadness. Nonetheless, their marriage appears to have been a truly effective and intimate partnership. "Throughout their married life, even if separated for only a few days, Clementine and Winston wrote spontaneous and informal letters to one another, intimately affectionate in tone, using their pet names Pug and Kat and reinforced with appropriate animal drawings." (ODNB) For their golden wedding anniversary “No interviews were given to the Press, and no public ceremony undertaken.” (Gilbert, VIII, p1276) Three and a half years earlier, on 5 April 1955, Churchill had irrevocably relinquished the reins of power when he resigned is second and final premiership at the age of 80. During the last decade of his long life, Churchill passed "into a living national memorial" of the time he had lived and the Nation, Empire, and free world he had served, culminating in his death on 24 January 1965 and his remarkably elaborate state funeral. In attendance were “six sovereigns, six presidents and sixteen prime ministers” as well as representatives of 112 nations. Queen Elizabeth II also attended – the first time in a century that a British monarch attend a commoner’s funeral. Before the service in St. Paul’s cathedral, Churchill’s coffin had passed through the countryside on a train. The Oxford don, Dr. A. L. Rowse, recorded “The Western sky filled with the lurid glow of winter sunset; the sun setting on the British Empire.”. Item #005447

Price: $100.00

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