Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman. Winston S. Churchill.
Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman
Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman
Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman
Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman
Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman
Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman
Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman

Marlborough: His Life and Times, Volumes I & II, owned and donated by eminent U.S. historian Douglas Southall Freeman

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1933. First edition. Hardcover. This U.S. first edition, first printing set of the first and second volumes was owned and donated by acclaimed historian Douglas Southall Freeman, whom Churchill knew and admired. Each front pastedown features a bookplate of the Library of the University of Richmond stating that the volume was a “Gift of Dr. Douglas S. Freeman”. At the bottom of each pastedown and on each lower title page are also “Library University of Richmond Virginia”, with “Withdrawn” ink stamps on the pastedowns. Overall condition is only good. Though the volumes are square and tight with sharp corners and Vol. II shelf presentation is quite respectable, the Vol. I spine is more toned and the gilt dulled and partly lost. There is also a 2.75 inch (6.99 cm) cosmetic split to the cloth along the front hinge beginning one inch (2.54 cm) below the spine head. The contents of both volumes are lightly toned, clean internally with light spotting confined to the top and fore edges. Called “America’s Greatest biographer” by fellow historian Allan Nevins, Douglas Southall Freeman (1886-1953) was the son of a soldier in Robert E. Lee’s Fourth Virginia Artillery who was wounded at the Siege of Petersburg. Freeman received his PhD in history in 1908 at the age of 22. While working as a journalist Freeman delved into Lee’s history and worked on his first book. Published in 1915, Lee’s Dispatches collected the previously unseen letters between the two most prominent figures of the Confederacy. Freeman’s book was an immediate success. Among his admirers was Winston Churchill, who was escorted by Freeman on a tour of Confederate battlefields during Churchill’s 1929 U.S. visit. Churchill’s 1930 article “If Lee Had Not Won at Gettysburg”, as well as his later writing about the American Civil War in A History of the English-Speaking Peoples, was undoubtedly influenced by this visit and tour with Freeman. Scribner’s invited Freeman to write a biography of Lee and the resulting four-volume biography, R. E. Lee, published in 1934 and 1935, won Freeman the Pulitzer Prize (1935). During the Second World War, Freeman’s ongoing work on Lee and his commanders brought Freeman wide acclaim in military circles. Generals George Marshall, Douglas MacArthur, and Dwight D. Eisenhower allegedly sought his council and the latter’s decision to run for president was at least partially thanks to Freeman’s suggestion. (Johnson, Douglas Southall Freeman, p.335) A 1948 Time profile notes “a letter from President Roosevelt thanking Freeman for suggesting the term “liberation” instead of “invasion” of Europe.” Freeman received a second Pulitzer posthumously for his seven-volume biography of George Washington. The attention Freeman devoted to Lee and his commanders Churchill gave to Marlborough. Winston Churchill's monumental biography of his great ancestor, John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, ultimately took 10 years of research and writing and is the most substantial published work of Churchill's "wilderness years" in the 1930s. This decade saw Churchill pass into his sixties with his own future as uncertain as that of his nation. Churchill may have wondered more than once if the life history he was writing would eclipse his own. Richard Langworth says "To understand the Churchill of the Second World War, the majestic blending of his commanding English with historical precedent, one has to read Marlborough." T. E. Lawrence wrote to Churchill in fulsome praise upon finishing Volume I: “I finished it only yesterday. I wish I had not… Marlborough has the big scene-painting, the informed pictures of men, the sober comment on political method, the humour, irony and understanding… It is history, solemn and decorative." Few would accuse Churchill of objectivity. Nonetheless, when Churchill was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1953, it was partly for “mastery of historical and biographical description” displayed in Marlborough. Reference: A97.4(I&II).a, Woods/ICS A40(ba), Langworth p.169. Item #005974

Price: $210.00

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