Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill. Winston S. Churchill.
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill
Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill

Marlborough: His Life and Times, a full set of jacketed British first editions inscribed and dated by Churchill

London: George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd. 1933. First edition, first printing. Hardcover. This jacketed full British first edition, first printing set of Churchill's Marlborough is inscribed and dated by Churchill in Volume II. Churchill signed only his first name indicating that the recipient was a personal friend or close associate. The inscription is in black ink on four lines on the ffep reading "To Mary M / from / Winston / Nov. 1934". Mary M is Lady Mary Minto - more formally Lady Mary Caroline Elliot Murray Kynynmound, Countess of Minto (1858-1940). Lady Minto was the wife of Gilbert Elliot-Murray-Kynynmound, 4th Earl of Minto (1845-1914) who served as Governor General of Canada from 1898-1904 and Viceroy of India from 1905-1910. When Churchill was a young officer in India seeking notoriety with despatches for The Daily Telegraph, it was Lord Minto who recognized Churchill's talent, but advised Churchill's mother, Lady Randolph, not to sign Winston's name to his work. Churchill's mother initially followed this advice, to the consternation of Winston who subsequently insisted on publishing his name with his despatches: "I had written them with the design of bringing my personality before the electorate. As to getting in trouble with the authorities, I am just as responsible now that they are not signed as if they had been." (Gilbert, Vol. I, pp. 355-356). Rejecting Lord Minto's advice harmed neither Churchill's career nor his relationship with the Mintos; Churchill spent Christmas 1900 as their guest at Government House in Ottawa. Also present was Pamela Plowden, in whom Churchill had harbored strong romantic interest. Still seeing to young Winston's welfare, Lord Minto wrote to Winston's mother "I think he ran no risks here - everything seemed to me to be very tolerably platonic". (Gilbert, Vol. I, p. 544). When Lord Minto was appointed Viceroy of India in 1905, Churchill was already a seasoned five-year veteran of Parliament. This time it was Winston who expressed concerns to Lady Randolph, but Lord Minto proved responsible for much admired reforms under the Liberal government of Churchill's party. (Gilbert, Vol. II, p.95) Lord Minto died in 1914, but Lady Minto lived to see the impetuously talented young man she hosted for Christmas in 1900 become Prime Minister of wartime Britain in 1940. Clearly, their association endured in the interval, as he inscribed this volume to her in 1934. Churchill's monumental biography of his great ancestor, John Churchill first Duke of Marlborough, was a ten year effort and is the most substantial published work of Churchill's "wilderness years" in the 1930s. The final volume was published on the eve of the Second World War. Published in four volumes between 1933 and 1938, Marlborough was well received - both critically and aesthetically. Collectors please note that the inscribed Volume II is a first edition, first printing - not a later printing. This volume is in fine condition. The binding is clean, tight, and square with no fading and virtually no wear. The contents are crisp, bright, and tight, appearing unread. A trivial hint of spotting is confined to the text block edges, which remain bright white with no age-toning. Age has slightly faded the author's inscription, but it remains clear with no ink spreading or smudging. The Volume II dust jacket is a true first printing, unclipped and highly complete with minor wear to extremities, minor soiling and spine toning and a closed tear at the upper front hinge. Volumes I, III, and IV are likewise first edition, first printing in correct, unclipped first edition first printing dust jackets. The books are in fine condition, with clean, unfaded bindings, no previous ownership marks, and no spotting. The Volume I, III, and IV dust jackets all vary in condition from very good plus to near-fine plus. All four dust jackets are protected in removable, archival quality clear covers. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A97.2(I-IV).a, Woods/ICS A40(aa), Langworth p.166. Item #001648

Price: $8,500.00

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