North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic. Seamus Heaney.
North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic
North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic
North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic
North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic
North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic
North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic

North, inscribed by the author in Gaelic

New York: Oxford University Press, 1977. First American edition in wrappers. Wraps. Heaney inscribed this first American wrappers (paperback) edition in Gaelic in three inked lines on the front free endpaper: “A Moira, | Slan agus Beannacht! | Seamus.” Rough translation: “To Moira, Goodbye and Blessings!” – ostensibly a personal inscription given use of first names. Condition is very good. This first U.S. wrappers edition closely mimics the dust jacket of the British first edition, with the same pale blue front cover and spine and front cover illustration. The binding is square, tight, and complete with sharp corners, the wraps only slightly toned, lightly worn at extremities, and creased along the front hinge with the number “175” inked at the upper left front cover. The sole previous ownership mark is “Dublin – June 10th – 1975” inked in a hand other than Heaney’s at the upper right corner of the front free endpaper, above the inscription. The date is a puzzle, given that publication of this American wrappers edition was 1977. Of note, the publication date of the British first edition was 9 June 1975. North marks Heaney’s artistic engagement with the Troubles. The conflict in Northern Ireland spanning the last three decades of the 20th century coincided with Heaney’s most prolific years as a poet. In 1972 he moved his family to Wicklow, south of Dublin, and began to write poetry full time. He wrote while “listening to the rain in the trees and to the news of bombings closer to home”. (Nobel Lecture, 1995) Heaney became deeply concerned with the notion of a poet’s responsibilities, writing, “for years I was bowed to the desk like some monk bowed over his prie-dieu, some dutiful contemplative pivoting his understanding in an attempt to bear his portion of the weight of the world” (Nobel Lecture). Heaney calls North “The book of mine that came most intensely out of the first shock of the Troubles…” (Interview, Stepping Stones, Dennis O’Driscoll, p.448) In part, North was prompted by Irish playwright Brian Friel’s 1975 play Volunteers, which is set on a construction site in Dublin where an archaeological dig is in progress, exposing layers of Irish history and the violence embedded therein. Heaney said: “…when I read the play, I immediately started typing out all the bog ‘Singing School’/St Columb’s poems and so on, and by the end of a weekend I found I had a manuscript that I could send to Faber as well as to Brian. That’s how North got assembled…” (Stepping Stones, p.179) The volume is in two parts. Part I is a metaphorical excavation of Ireland’s history, mining “the stable element, the land itself, that we must look for continuity” (“The Sense of Place”, lecture, 1977). The poems of “Part II” are more “conversational and personal”. Of them, Heaney said “They were a second movement as much as they were a second section… different in pitch but… integral to the book… They come out of ‘the matter of the North’ of Ireland.” (Stepping Stones, p.179) North, Heaney said, does “What the necessary poetry always does, which is to touch the base of our sympathetic nature while taking in at the same time the unsympathetic reality of the world to which that nature is constantly exposed” (Nobel Lecture). Seamus Justin Heaney (1939-2013) was the first of nine children born to a farmer and raised in rural County Derry “in suspension between the archaic and the modern.” At Queens University Belfast Heaney evolved into a poet. In 1965 Heaney was a member of a group of young Belfast poets known as “The Group” when his first book, Eleven Poems, was published by Queen’s Festival Publications to coincide with their 1965 festival. The 1966 publication of Death of a Naturalist brought critical acclaim. The next half century saw Heaney publish a dozen poetry collections, as well as prose, plays, and numerous translations. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995 "for works of lyrical beauty and ethical depth, which exalt everyday miracles and the living past". Reference: Brandes & Durkan A12d. Item #004629

Price: $400.00

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