Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary. Robert E. Sherwood.
Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary
Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary
Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary
Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary
Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary
Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary

Abe Lincoln in Illinois, the Pulitzer Prize-winning play by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech writer Robert E. Sherwood, with a striking wartime inscription to his White House colleague and friend Dorothy Brady, Roosevelt's personal secretary

New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1941. Hardcover. This presentation copy of the Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Abe Lincoln in Illinois, features a splendid wartime inscription from the author to his White House colleague and FDR’s secretary, Dorothy Brady. Fourteen inked lines filling the front free endpaper read: "Dear Dorothy, | This is a play I wrote | about Abraham Lincoln. | Someday someone will write a play about Franklin D. | Roosevelt, and when their | play is produced the actress | who appears in the rôle | of “Dorothy Brady” had | better be good. | Yours, | Bob Sherwood | June | 1942”. Per the title page, this is the 1941 printing. Condition is very good. The red cloth binding is square and tight with nominal spine sunning. Apart from the author’s inscription, the contents are free of ownership marks. The endpapers show transfer browning from the pastedown glue and the contents are moderately age-toned but otherwise clean with no spotting. Robert Emmet Sherwood’s (1896-1955) considerable talent and influence spanned popular, literary, and political realms. Sherwood’s path to four Pulitzer Prizes and presidential speech writing was as interesting as it was unlikely. On academic probation at Harvard at the onset of the First World War, Sherwood sought to enlist. Rejected by the U.S. Army for his 6’ 6” height, he joined the Canadian Expeditionary Force. The trenches of France imparted lifelong pacifist sentiments. A post-war job at Vanity Fair introduced Sherwood to Robert Benchley and Dorothy Parker, with whom he started the Algonquin Round Table, one of the most influential literary groups of the early twentieth century. As one of Hollywood’s first dedicated movie reviewers, Sherwood was an archetype frustrated artist, writing that a critic is “a man who is constantly persuading himself that some day he is going to write something worthwhile.” “Some day” came in 1927 with the production of his first play The Road to Rome, paving the way for his eventual three Pulitzer Prizes in Drama. In 1939, Abe Lincoln in Illinois won Sherwood his second Pulitzer. Sherwood’s biographer, Harriet Hyman Alonso, said that the play was “about three men - Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Robert E. Sherwood - and their search for an answer to their moral aversion to war in a world in which horrific deeds were being committed." Sherwood went from writing fictional dialogue for the 16th president to writing living words for the 32nd. In October 1940 he joined Harry Hopkins and Samuel Rosenman as speechwriter for Franklin D. Roosevelt. Sherwood later recalled that “The collaboration between the three of us and the President was so close and so constant that we generally ended up unable to say specifically who had been primarily responsible for any given sentence or phrase.” Sherwood also served as Director of the Office of War Information from 1943 until the war’s end. After FDR and Hopkins died, Sherwood wrote Roosevelt and Hopkins: An Intimate History, winning Sherwood his final Pulitzer Prize (in Biography). Dorothy Jones Brady, to whom Sherwood inscribed this book, began her federal career in the Department of Agriculture secretarial pool. After being reassigned to the White House and substituting several times for FDR’s secretary, Grace Tully, Brady accompanied FDR on campaign trips and on visits to his home at Hyde Park. She was with FDR when he died on 12 April 1945, less than a year after D-Day and less than a month before Germany’s 7 May 1945 unconditional surrender. On 18 January 1945, while Roosevelt was working on a speech in his West Wing office, he asked Brady and other staff present, including Sherwood, “What in this room reminds you the most of me?” Brady named “a portrait of John Paul Jones.” When Brady returned from the final trip to Warm Springs, she found the portrait waiting for her. Brady went on to serve as secretary to Cabinet members and assistant to the President of the Pullman railroad car company. She died at age 87 in 1999. Item #004724

Price: $2,200.00

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