The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996. Winston S. Churchill.
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996
The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996

The Dream, a publisher's presentation copy and one of 10 proof copies of the 80 specially prepared for members of the Churchill Family in celebration of the one-hundred twentieth anniversary of the birth of Sir Winston Churchill, inscribed by the editor and publisher, Richard Langworth, at Bletchley Park in 1996

Contoocook, New Hampshire: Churchill Literary Foundation, 1994. Proof copy of the limited issue of the second edition. Full leather. The Dream is Churchill's revealing essay about a ghostly reunion with his father, Lord Randolph Churchill, in which Winston recounts world events that have transpired since his father's death - without revealing his own role in them. Here is the most elusive and arguably most desirable version of this essay. The Dream was first published in book form in a limited edition of 500 copies in 1987. A second, paperback, edition was issued in 1994. That 1994 second edition is comparatively unremarkable except for 80 copies specially bound in green leather with light green marbled endpapers and gilt page edges, with an extra sheet (comprising two leaves and four pages) inserted, including limitation information. Of these 80 copies, 70 were “bound in leather for the Churchill family, celebrating the 120th anniversary of Sir Winston’s birth at the Pinafore Room, Hotel Savoy, London on 30 November 1994.” Just 10 copies were designated “Proof Copy”. This one of those 10 features a lengthy, 10-line inked inscription: “for Jack Darrah and the | Bletchley Park Trust | commemorating the visit of the | International Churchill Societies | to | Bletchley Park | 2 October 1996 | from | Richard Langworth | with grateful thanks”. Condition is near fine. The green leather binding is tight, clean, and unfaded. We note just a few trivial scuffs and a rectangular shape of slight discoloration to the blank rear cover. The contents are immaculate. Laid in is a 5 x 3.75 inch heavy printed card with a brief explanation of the origin of The Dream printed in large font. It seems likely that this card was used for display purposes, consonant with the recipient of this copy. Jack Darrah (1925-2016) was a Churchill enthusiast whose extensive, 3,000+ piece collection of Churchill material – “one of the finest collections of Churchilliana in existence” – was long on display in a special “Churchill Room” at Bletchley Park and is now permanently housed in the Stratford Armouries in Stratford-Upon-Avon. Bletchley Park was of course the once top secret home of the famous British code-breaking efforts during the Second World War, which included Alan Turing and counted among its successes the cracking of the German Enigma coding machine. Winston Churchill's father, Lord Randolph, died in January 1895 at age 45 following the spectacular collapse of both his health and political career. His son Winston was 20 years old. History and longevity would dramatically favor the son, but when Randolph died, Winston dwelt very much in his father's shadow, both emotionally and in terms of his political aspirations. In this small, intimate piece of writing we see Churchill with that shadow on the eve of his 73rd birthday. According to Churchill, a "foggy afternoon in November 1947" found him in his "studio at the cottage down the hill at Chartwell" attempting to paint a copy of a damaged portrait of Lord Randolph when he turned around to find his father sitting in a red leather armchair, looking just as Churchill "had seen him in his prime." A conversation ensued about what had - and had not - changed since Randolph's time, ranging from trivialities and individual personalities to politics and the broad sweep of world affairs. Churchill never reveals his role in much of this history. Churchill's summary observations and appraisals to his father make a worthwhile study in themselves. But these are perhaps overshadowed by the emotional overtones which psychologists and sentimentalists will doubtless continue to parse for years to come. His family called it "The Dream." Churchill titled it simply "Private Article." Though he was seldom stinting with his words or their publication, Churchill locked the essay in a box where it remained, willed to his wife. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A288.3, Langworth p.358. Item #004729

Price: $950.00