My Ally. compiler unknown but possibly Wilhelm Liljencrantz Winston Churchill.
My Ally
My Ally
My Ally
My Ally
My Ally

My Ally

The German Government (no publisher indicated), 1940 (n.d.). English-language edition, only printing. Paperback. This is a rare and fascinating wartime Nazi propaganda piece ridiculing Churchill's wartime alliance of convenience with Stalin. It was produced by the Germans specifically to help recruit captured British soldiers to the Britisher Freikorps, the SS unit made up of British troops. This English language edition was distributed to British POWs. Versions are known in Croatian, French, German, Norwegian, and Swedish, but by far the most important and scarce is the English language version. The format is newspaper cartoons critical of Stalin on each right hand page with notes and Churchill quotes critical of communist Russia on opposing pages. The effect is a stinging contrast between Churchill's wartime alliance of necessity with his long history of ardent anti-communist sentiment. The book measures 8 5/8 x 6 inches, is 110 pages long, and is bound in cream-colored card wraps. The title page lists Winston Churchill as author, with both the publisher and the editor unspecified. There is an unsigned, two-page preface at the beginning and a three-page list of "Sources of Reference" at the end. Publication was of course directly at the behest of the Nazi government. Ronald Cohen speculates that Wilhelm Liljencrantz may have been the compiler. Given the nature of this perishable wartime publication, surviving copies are quite scarce. This is a complete copy of the English language issue of My Ally, showing some effects of age but nonetheless fully intact and with potentially interesting provenance. The cream-colored card binding is tight and square with no tears, including no vertical creasing of the spine. We note significant overall spotting and soiling, light wear to extremities, small creases to a few corners, and a small, closed tear at the lower spine. The contents are printed on cheap, newsprint-style wartime paper. The contents are thus inevitably age-toned, but nonetheless fully intact. The sole previous ownership mark suggests intriguing provenance. Written in pencil on the upper corner of the title page is: "Tarasov - pers. copy". This may be in reference to Major General German Fyodorovich Tarasov, a commander in the Red Army and later, during WWII, the Soviet Army. Though we cannot substantiate this specific Tarasov's ownership, the Russian name certainly seems to put this copy in Soviet hands. Understandably the propaganda contained within highlighting the animus between these allies of necessity makes this volume of particular interest to a Soviet fighting who fought for the Allied cause. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A122.1, Woods D(a)6, Zoller A68. Item #004882

Price: $750.00