The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel. Field-Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis.
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel
The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel

The Memoirs of Field Marshal Earl Alexander of Tunis 1940:1945, with a 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander regarding the North Africa campaign, referencing both Patton and Rommel

London: Cassell & Company Ltd., 1962. First edition. Hardcover. This 25 May 1963 holograph signed letter from Field Marshal Alexander, First Earl Alexander of Tunis, was found in a copy of his Memoirs and discusses the British and U.S. offensive in North Africa, specifically mentioning both Patton and Rommel. The letter is inked in blue on the recto and verso of a single sheet of stationery printed “Winkfield Lodge | Windsor Forest | Berkshire | Winkfield Row 240”. The letter reads in full: “Dear Mr. [ ] | Thank you for your letter of May 12th. | No doubt I have failed to make clear | in my memoirs that the reference to | the Fondouk was not in relation | to the earlier battles in January, but | to the 7/8 April when the 34th U.S. | Division was unable to make any | progress in the efforts to secure the | southern length of the Fondouk Pass. | On the 9th April IX Corp was ordered | to launch 6th Armoured Division after | 34th Divs’ failure-. The object of this | operation was to cut off Rommel | and his Afrika Corp from pairing | up with von Arnim’s forces in Tunis – | However, we just missed doing this. | I was with the late General George | Patton at the time and on the | spot – and you can well imagine | our disappointment – to the end, | it didn’t prevent our final victory | but it did delay it. | Yours Sincerely, | Alexander”. The letter is in fine condition within the original hand-addressed envelope, franked 27 May 1963. The letter is laid into a jacketed British first edition of Alexander’s Memoirs in near fine condition in a very good plus dust jacket. Field Marshal Harold Rupert Leofric George Alexander, first Earl Alexander of Tunis (1891-1969) was born to aristocracy and as a young man showed athleticism and a passion for painting. He attended Sandhurst and was commissioned in the Irish Guards in 1911, intending to serve a few years before retiring to pursue art. The First World War redirected his life. In 1914 Alexander was sent to France, where he served until early 1919 “being in action throughout except when recovering from wounds or on courses.” (ODNB) Though he continued painting for the rest of his life, his service evolved into a military career. In the following two decades he served in Constantinople, Gibraltar, and India before being promoted to major-general in 1937. At 45, Alexander was the youngest general in the British army. At Dunkirk he gained prominence overseeing evacuation of nearly 120,000 British and French personnel. Alexander “left on the last motor launch, touring the beaches to see that there were no British troops remaining.” (ODNB) In February 1942 Churchill sent Alexander to Burma, a mission of which Churchill wrote “never have I taken the responsibility for sending a general on a more forlorn hope.” (The Hinge of Fate, p.167) Though Alexander was able only to withdraw the remaining army to India, Churchill recognized Alexander’s ability, appointing him Commander-in-Chief, Middle East, in August 1942. The Fondouk Pass episode referenced in Alexander’s letter refers to a failed combined U.S. and British offensive preceding victory in North Africa. In May 1943 Alexander sent the Prime Minister the message: “Sir: It is my duty to report that the Tunisian campaign is over. All enemy resistance has ceased. We are masters of the North African shores.” (THoF, p.780) Throughout the war, Alexander “always spent more time with the forward troops than in his headquarters. His popularity was immense, and his strategic planning benefited because he knew what the war was like at the point that counted.” (ODNB) Churchill wrote “Nothing ever disturbed or rattled him, and duty was a full satisfaction in itself, especially if it seemed perilous and hard… this was combined with so gay and easy a manner that the pleasure and honour of his friendship was prized by all those who enjoyed it, among whom I could count myself.” (THoF, p.167) After the war he served as Governor-General of Canada, and as Minister of Defence during Churchill’s second Premiership. Item #004921

Price: $700.00