Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade)

New York: Charles L. Webster and Company, 1885. First edition, first issue. This is a first edition, first issue of one of the most celebrated works of American literature. This copy of the notoriously bibliographically complex novel contains the three generally agreed-upon first issue indicators – the Contents Chapter VI heading reading “Decided”, the illustration “Him and another Man” incorrectly listed at page 88 on page 13, and “with the was” on page 57. The frontispiece is a second issue with the Heliotype Printing Company imprint and no tablecloth visible, but “it must be emphasized that the portrait frontispiece is an insert and as such has no relation to the sheets of the book.” (Bibliography of American Literature) This is a good example overall, complete and presentable, but certainly showing age, wear, and judicious preservation. This volume retains the publisher’s famously illustrated green cloth binding, which has been repaired. This volume has been rebacked with the original spine cloth skillfully laid over new, matching cloth beneath, as well as new endpapers. The moderately frayed and worn corners of the boards likewise show unobtrusive repair, exposed portions being dyed to match the green of the original cloth. The contents are clean and free of spotting, but likewise have some flaws. The brittle, coated paper of the frontispiece (which was a non-integral publisher’s insert) has split at the gutter, leaving the leaf loose. There is minor water damage, leaving a shallow tideline in the upper margins of some pages. Ownership markings are limited to a contemporary owner name and “Brooklyn” on the ffep. This book was gifted in thanks by filmmaker Ken Burns for contributions to his 2001 documentary on the life of Mark Twain and acquired by us from the recipient. Samuel Clemens (1835-1910) ranks among the greatest American writers. Twain was born sixth of seven children in Florida, Missouri shortly after an appearance of Halley’s Comet and would famously die with its reappearance. When he was four, his family moved to Hannibal, Missouri, a Mississippi River town characterized by the comings and goings of steamships, which brought with them tradesmen, circuses, and revivalists, as well as violence. Hannibal would inspire the setting of two of Twain’s most well-known works, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and its sequel Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. By 1851, a teenage Twain was flirting with a literary career, working as a typesetter and writing for the Hannibal Western Union. A brief career as a steamboat pilot was cut short by the 1861 outbreak of the Civil War. Two weeks with a Confederate volunteer unit was enough for Twain; he boarded a stagecoach heading west. After failing at prospecting, he became a writer for a series of western newspapers under a pen name inspired by his days on the Mississippi – “Mark Twain” was steamboat slang for two fathoms of water. Twain first gained fame from a story inspired by his days in mining camps, eventually published in book form in 1867 under the title “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County”. Twain achieved success with books based on his travels abroad and experiences in the American West. In 1876 Twain published The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Shortly after publication Twain began working on a sequel centered on Huckleberry Finn. Over the next seven years Twain sporadically composed the novel, writing and rewriting before settling on the vernacular, first person narration style. When it was finally published in the US in 1885 it sold better than any of Twain’s previous works of fiction, due in no small part to the controversy surrounding it. The Concord Library Committee famously called it “the veriest trash”, a criticism which prompted Twain to comment to his editor that such a criticism was sure to garner more sales. Of Huckleberry Finn Hemingway wrote “It’s the best book we’ve had. All American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing since.”. Item #005532

Price: $1,150.00

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