One Hundred Years of Solitude. Gabriel García Márquez, Gregory Rabassa.
One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude
One Hundred Years of Solitude

One Hundred Years of Solitude

New York and Evanston: Harper & Row, Publishers, 1970. First edition. Hardcover. This U.S. first edition, first printing of Gabriel García Márquez’s landmark work of Latin American literature is very good in a very good dust jacket. The green cloth binding with matching yellow and green head and foot bands is tight with a nominal forward lean. The covers are clean with lightly bumped lower corners, bright gilt print to the slightly wrinkled spine, and some light shelf wear. The contents and page edges are clean and bright. A trivial hint of spotting appears confined to the top edges. Mild differential toning of the green endpapers corresponds to the dust jacket flaps. A previous owner name inked on the front free endpaper is dated “April 14, 1970” - the year of publication. First edition is so stated on the copyright page, first printing confirmed by the lack of a number series on the final leaf of the text (p.422). The dust jacket is a second state of the first printing, so identified by the presence of a period rather than an exclamation point following the end of the first paragraph on the front flap. The jacket is bright, clean, and complete, with no loss and retaining the original “$7.95” front flap price. The colors remain vivid on both the front panel and spine. Light wear is confined to extremities. The dust jacket is protected beneath a removable, clear, archival cover. Called “the greatest revelation in the Spanish language since Don Quixote of Cervantes” by Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, One Hundred Years of Solitude established its author as one of the foremost writers in the Spanish language literary canon. Gabriel García Márquez (1927-2014) was born in the small town of Aracataca, Colombia, in the tropical jungles between the mountains and the Caribbean. After high school he was sent to Bogotá to study law, but education was cut short when his university closed and his boarding house burned following the bloody uprising known as El Bogotazo that followed the assassination of politician Jorge Eliécer Gaitán on 9 April 1948. He moved to Cartegena, working as a journalist before he was sent to Rome on assignment in 1954. He struggled for the next decade, living in Paris, New York, Barcelona, and Mexico City. In 1965 a Mexico City literary agent, Carmen Balcells, approached Márquez. She had read one of his early novellas and, seeing promise, found a U.S. publisher, Harper & Row, that agreed to a contract for Márquez’s previous work as well as first U.S. rights to his next work. The next work was the culmination of two decades of bits and pieces of writing inspired by his birthplace. For eighteen months Márquez labored on the story of the Buendía family, whose patriarch who founded the small town of Macondo, and the generations who followed. As Márquez dedicated himself to writing his wife resorted to pawning the household piece by piece. When Márquez took the typescript to send to the publisher in Buenos Aires, he had only enough pesos for half of the postage. He sent the first half of the manuscript; the rest followed only after a trip to the pawnshop. Happily the sacrifices paid off. In the first week of publication 8,000 copies sold in Argentina alone, an unprecedented number for a literary novel in South America. The American first edition was translated by Gregory Rabassa, whose translation was deemed better than the Spanish original by Márquez himself. The response to the US publication was immediate and overwhelmingly positive to the point of hyperbole (Pulitzer Prize winning journalist William Kennedy called it “the first piece of literature since the Book of Genesis that should be required reading for the entire human race”). The dreamy subjectivity of reality depicted in the novel makes this book the exemplar of the magic realism style. The story of the Buendías blends Colombian myths, history, pure fiction, and metafiction with the writer himself appearing as a character. The success of this book laid the foundation for Márquez’s 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. Item #005536

Price: $800.00

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