The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel. Joe Haldeman.
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel
The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel

The Forever War, inscribed and dated by the author on 6 September 1976 at the Hugo Awards Ceremony where the book won Best Novel

New York: St. Martin's Press, 1974. First edition, first printing. This is a superlative first edition, first printing of Haldeman’s acclaimed novel, inscribed and dated by Haldeman at the ceremony where the book received the Hugo Award for Best Novel. The inscription, inked in blue in four lines on the half-title, reads “For Jeff Levin | 6 Sept ’76 | Hugo Awards Ceremony | Joe W Haldeman”. The 1976 Hugo Awards were presented at MidAmeriCon in Kansas City, held from 2-6 September 1976.  The Forever War had already won the 1975 Nebula Award for best novel and also won the 1976 Locus Award. Condition of this copy is virtually as-new, the dust jacket crisp and complete with no appreciable wear, the binding pristine and pleasingly stiff, as if only opened when signed, the contents bright, crisp, and immaculately clean - unmarked except by the author. “First Printing” is helpfully so stated on the title page verso. The identity of the inscription recipient, “Jeff Levin” is uncertain, but the book nonetheless has sterling science fiction provenance; this book came from the collection of Daniel “Dan” Breen, an avid collector and proprietor (from 1985-2003) of a science fiction and fantasy bookshop - Second Foundation Bookstore – in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Haldeman’s novel is at once a compelling crafted science fiction tale and an anti-war treatise rooted in the author’s own experience as a combat engineer in Vietnam who was wounded and decorated with a Purple Heart. Haldeman’s novel centers around the experience and improbable survival of his protagonist, William Mandella, drafted along with other “best and brightest” of Earth’s intellectual and physical elite to fight a distant, virtually unknown alien species, the enigmatic Taurans. The conflict we view through the prism of Mandella’s experience turns out to last 1200 years. And to have been a mistake based on misunderstanding. Relativistic space travel and time dilation serve to emphasize the alienating effects of war on Mandella and his fellow soldiers, allowing the author to show a long span of human social evolution, and to emphasize the profound futility of the conflict. By the end of the war and the novel, even the protagonist’s own version of humanity has become anachronistic. It is worth noting that Haldeman’s initial portrayal of a grimly depressed and socially devolved and debased wartime earth was deemed too dark by his editor and thus altered by Haldeman prior to publication.  Haldeman’s original version had to wait more than a decade and a half after this first edition for publication. Haldeman’s Forever War and William Mandella were widely characterized as a deft, anti-war repudiation of Robert Heinlein’s Starship Troopers (1960 Hugo Award for best novel) and Juan “Johnny” Rico. This seems a compound gross simplification - of Heinlein’s views on war and society, Haldeman’s own complex motivations as a writer, and the fact that, beneath the socio-political messaging of Haldeman’s book is the fundamental commonality of compellingly well-wrought speculative fiction story. Nonetheless, the two novels offer strikingly similar story arcs with decidedly different perspectives. Among the accolades drawn by The Forever War, Heinlein wrote to Haldeman, congratulating him on his Nebula Award, to say that the book “may be the best future war story I’ve ever read”. Haldeman allegedly claimed that Heinlein’s letter “meant more to him than the award itself.”. Item #005714

Price: $1,400.00

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