Ian Hamilton's March, finely bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London. Winston S. Churchill.
Ian Hamilton's March, finely bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London
Ian Hamilton's March, finely bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London
Ian Hamilton's March, finely bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London
Ian Hamilton's March, finely bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London
Ian Hamilton's March, finely bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London

Ian Hamilton's March, finely bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London

London: Longmans, Green, & Co., 1900. First edition, first printing. Full leather. This is the British first edition, first printing, first issue of Churchill's fifth published book, magnificently bound in full red morocco by Zaehnsdorf for Asprey of London. The elegant binding features a hubbed spine with gilt ruled and decorated compartments, and gilt tooled spine bands. The covers feature a gilt border rule and Churchill’s facsimile signature in gilt on the front cover center, as well as gilt ruled cover edges, and gilt page edges. Generous turn-ins with decorative gilt tooling bordered by gilt rules frame striking marbled endpapers. Even the gold, red, and black head and foot bands are executed with noteworthy skill and aesthetic effect. This lovely example of the binder’s craft is a reminder to collectors that not all fine bindings are created equal. “BOUND BY ZAEHNSDORF FOR ASPREY & CO” is gilt-stamped on the lower front pastedown. The luxury goods firm Asprey of London was established in 1781. Asprey began offering finely bound reference books in the early 1900s, which after the Second World War developed to include a range of both antiquarian and new books finely bound by Asprey. The renowned Zaehnsdorf Bindery was founded in London in 1842 by Austria-Hungary-born Joseph Zaehnsdorf (1816-1886) and run by him, his son, and his grandson for over one hundred years. Asprey acquired Zaehnsdorf in 1983. Condition is fine. The binding is square, immaculately clean, and tight with no reportable wear or blemishes apart from perhaps a barely discernible hint of color shift to the spine. The contents are crisp and quite clean for the edition, with no previous ownership marks and only modest, intermittent spotting. The frontispiece and all maps and plans are present, as is the publisher’s extensive rear catalogue, which was happily retained when this copy was rebound. Ian Hamilton's March was the second of Churchill's two books based on his newspaper despatches sent from the front in South Africa during the Boer War. In October 1899, the second Boer War erupted between the descendants of Dutch settlers in South Africa and the British. Churchill, an adventure-seeking young cavalry officer and war correspondent, swiftly found himself in South Africa with the 21st Lancers and an assignment as press correspondent to the Morning Post. Not long thereafter, on 15 November 1899, Churchill was captured during a Boer ambush of an armored train. His daring escape less than a month later rendered him a celebrity and helped launch his political career. Churchill's first book of Boer War despatches, London to Ladysmith via Pretoria, was published in England in mid-May 1900 and sold well. Ian Hamilton's March completes Churchill's coverage of the Boer War, publishing 17 letters to the Morning Post, spanning 31 March through 14 June 1900. The narrative in Ian Hamilton's March includes the liberation of the Pretoria prison camp where Churchill had been held. Though a companion and sequel to London to Ladysmith, it is notably different in content, and scarcity. The first printing saw only 5,000 copies - half as many copies as London to Ladysmith. While London to Ladysmith via Pretoria had swiftly published Churchill's dispatches in the wake of his capture and escape, for Ian Hamilton's March "the texts of the originally published letters were more extensively revised and four letters were included which had never appeared in periodical form" (Cohen, A8.1.a, Vol. I, p.104). Churchill effected these revisions while on board the passenger and cargo steamer Dunottar Castle, which was requisitioned as a troop ship, en route home to England. Arriving home from South Africa in July 1900, Churchill spent the summer campaigning hard in Oldham, where he won his first seat in Parliament on 1 October 1900 in the so-called "khaki election". The British first edition of Ian Hamilton's March was published just a few weeks later. Bibliographic reference: Cohen A8.1.a, Woods/ICS A5(a), Langworth p.59. Item #005723

Price: $1,650.00