Punch, or The London Charivari, No. 4147, Volume CLIX, December 29, 1920
Punch, or The London Charivari, No. 4147, Volume CLIX, December 29, 1920
Punch, or The London Charivari, No. 4147, Volume CLIX, December 29, 1920

Punch, or The London Charivari, No. 4147, Volume CLIX, December 29, 1920

London: Herbert Heather, 1920. Magazine, wire-stitched. This original 29 December 1920 issue of Punch magazine contains a political cartoon featuring Winston Churchill at p.512. Titled “ESSENCE OF PARLIAMENT”, the cartoon features Churchill in the company of “Mr. Bonar Law, Mr. Lloyd George, Mr. Shortt, Mr. Chamberlain, Mr. Neal, Sir Eric Geddes, Sir Robert Horne”. Churchill is at the left, leaning forward with clasped hands. Then-Prime Minister David Lloyd George is shown pontificating, Shortt, Chamberlain, Neal, Gedes, Horne and Churchill attentive to Lloyd George’s right, Bonar Law contemplating behind him. The cartoon is captioned “Mr. Lloyd George (Chairman). ‘You’ve worked splendidly up to Christmas, and if you’ll put your backs into it for the New Year trade I’ll see if I can’t give you a good long holiday in the autumn.’ Mr. Bonar Law (Manager). ‘Or some other time.’” At the time, Churchill was Secretary of State for War and Air. It is remarkable to consider that nearly two decades, a change in political party, scores of political issues and fights, and nearly a decade of political isolation lay between the Churchill in this cartoon and the Churchill who became wartime Prime Minister in May 1940. Condition of the magazine approaches very good, particularly considering the age and inherent fragility. The illustrated paper wraps are firmly attached and fully intact, though moderately toned and lightly soiled. The contents are clean and bright. Both original binding staples show only slight surface corrosion. Punch or The London Charivari was a weekly British magazine of humour and satire established in 1841. Renowned for wit and irreverence, Punch was known for its cartoons and is credited with introducing the term ‘cartoon’ as we know it today. "...Winston Churchill undoubtedly became the most caricatured and cartooned politician of all time." For more than half a century, from his first election to Parliament in 1900 through his retirement as prime minister in April 1955, "Churchill was taken to task by cartoonists at every available opportunity.” (Churchill in Caricature, 2005) So much so that Churchill embraced all the artistic attention with customary humor and resolve and wrote an article about being caricatured in which he asserted that “politicians get used to being caricatured. In fact, by a strange trait in human nature they even get to like it.” (“Cartoons and Cartoonists”, Strand Magazine, June 1931). Item #005897

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