An original Second World War piece of Nazi German "wall newspaper" propaganda featuring British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill fleeing both German bombs and bombast
An original Second World War piece of Nazi German "wall newspaper" propaganda featuring British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill fleeing both German bombs and bombast
An original Second World War piece of Nazi German "wall newspaper" propaganda featuring British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill fleeing both German bombs and bombast
An original Second World War piece of Nazi German "wall newspaper" propaganda featuring British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill fleeing both German bombs and bombast

An original Second World War piece of Nazi German "wall newspaper" propaganda featuring British Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill fleeing both German bombs and bombast

Berlin: Printed by Die Parole der Woche for the National-Sozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter Partei (NSDAP), 1942. This large, striking, and scarce piece of Second World War Nazi propaganda is a wall newspaper produced by Die Parole Der Worche. The wall newspaper depicts Winston Churchill hastening away from both an incoming bomb and a torrent of Nazi invective. We intentionally use the term “wall newspaper” in lieu of “poster” consistent with both the terminology and intention with which this original piece of Second World War Third Reich propaganda was produced.

The bomb silhouette contains the caption: der mann, der den bombenkrieg gegen die zivilbevölkerung erfunden hat, which translates to the man who invented the bombing of civilians. Also featured are excerpts from Adolf Hitler’s speech that took place in Berlin on 30 September 1942 at the Berliner Sportpalast. Over the course of the speech, Hitler defames Churchill, extols the Aryan race, demonizes the Jewish population, and declares ende für England schrecklicher sein wird els der anfang: the end for England will be more horrible than the beginning.

This wall newspaper’s condition is very good, particularly given the age, size, and inherent fragility. The piece is quite large, measuring 47.125 x 33 inches (120cm x 84cm). There are three vertical and three horizontal folds consonant with how the poster was originally folded by the publisher. A broken publisher’s sticker still affixed in two pieces to the verso affirms that it was originally delivered folded thus. Despite wear and minor fraying to the edges, the wall newspaper remains complete, vividly bright, and surprisingly clean. Short closed tears and minor chipping to the edges generally do not intrude further than the blank white margins.

The distinctly unsubtle graphic, bold, red and black text, underlining, and multiple exclamation points make this unmistakably a piece of Nazi propaganda. This wall newspaper viscerally conveys the hyperbolic and hysterical animus of the Nazi regime and, specifically, the tenor of its leader, Adolf Hitler. If Winston Churchill and Franklin D. Roosevelt were destined to forge one of the great partnerships of 20th century leadership, Churchill and Hitler seemed destined to be one another's inevitable antithesis. Hitler spent the 1930s steadily rising, consolidating his power and girding and arming his ambitions. Churchill spent the 1930s out of power and out of favor, persistently warning about the growing Nazi threat and routinely at odds with both his own Conservative Party leadership and prevailing public sentiment. It was the moment that Hitler unequivocally and undeniably clarified his ambitions - the invasion of Poland in September 1939 - that vindicated Churchill, returned him to power, and ultimately put him in a position to thwart Hitler. This wall newspaper testifies to just how much Churchill frustrated Hitler's agenda and ambitions.

First conceived in 1936 for the purpose of printing Reichstag election campaign leaflets, Die Parole der Worche—or: The Slogan of the Week—disseminated ideology consistent with that of the National-Sozialistische Deutsche Arbeiter Partei (NSDAP). The 1936 Reichstag election consisted of a single question referendum asking voters if they approved of Germany’s occupation of the Rhineland—the area of land that loosely runs along Germany’s border and connects with Belgium and France—and consisted of a single party list composed exclusively of Nazis and Nazi sympathizers. Die Parole der Worche continued to operate as a voracious propaganda machine once the NSDAP assumed absolute power under Hitler, and published more than 400 episodes between 1936 and 1943. This official NSDAP wall newspaper is a print of the 43rd episode that was released in October, 1942. The broken tab that originally secured the folded wall newspaper bears the name Franz Cher Rachf, ostensibly the publisher of this piece, who was the original publisher of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf in 1925. Item #006064

Price: $1,000.00

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