The Sinews of Peace. Winston S. Churchill.
The Sinews of Peace
The Sinews of Peace
The Sinews of Peace

The Sinews of Peace

New York: Halcyon-Commonwealth Foundation, 1965. Second Edition, only printing. Paperback. This is the 1965 (the year of Churchill’s death) publication of Churchill's famous "Iron Curtain" speech given at Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri on March 5, 1946.

This edition of the speech contains a preface by Truman, and is quite attractive, string-bound in off-white card wraps with turn-in flaps, with red print and illustration on the front cover. This copy approaches very good condition. The cream card wraps are complete, as is the original string binding, though the wraps are moderately age-toned and soiled. The contents are clean with no previous ownership marks and no spotting.

At Fulton, Churchill coined the phrase that described the division between the Soviet Union's sphere of influence and the West. This speech incisively framed the Cold War that would dominate the second half of the Twentieth Century: "From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent.... I repulse the idea that a new war is inevitable; still more that it is imminent... If we adhere faithfully to the Charter of the United Nations and walk forward in sedate and sober strength seeking no one's land or treasure, seeking to lay no arbitrary control upon the thoughts of men... the high-roads of the future will be clear, not only for us but for all, not only for our time, but for a century to come.”

Then-President Harry S. Truman traveled with Churchill by special train from Washington D.C. for the twenty four hour overnight journey to Jefferson City, Missouri, specifically to introduce Churchill in Fulton. During the journey, they discussed recent Soviet provocations in northern Persia and Turkey. "During the morning of March 5, as the train continued westward along the Missouri river, Churchill completed his speech for Fulton. It was then mimeographed on the train, and a copy shown to Truman" who told Churchill that he “thought it was admirable” and “would do nothing but good, though it would make a stir.” (Gilbert, Vol. VIII, pp.196-197). Though the subject of the speech was of utmost gravity, Churchill began with characteristic wit: “The name ‘Westminster’ is somehow familiar to me. I seem to have heard of it before.”

Reference: Cohen A225.2. Item #006231

Price: $120.00

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