View from Chartwell, a limited and numbered lithograph reproduction of Churchill's c.1938 painting of his beloved country home, Chartwell. Artist: Winston S. Churchill.
View from Chartwell, a limited and numbered lithograph reproduction of Churchill's c.1938 painting of his beloved country home, Chartwell
View from Chartwell, a limited and numbered lithograph reproduction of Churchill's c.1938 painting of his beloved country home, Chartwell
View from Chartwell, a limited and numbered lithograph reproduction of Churchill's c.1938 painting of his beloved country home, Chartwell
View from Chartwell, a limited and numbered lithograph reproduction of Churchill's c.1938 painting of his beloved country home, Chartwell

View from Chartwell, a limited and numbered lithograph reproduction of Churchill's c.1938 painting of his beloved country home, Chartwell

London: Sir Winston Churchill Trust, 2005. Limited and numbered edition. This limited and numbered lithograph of an original painting by Winston S. Churchill beautifully combines two of the inspirational refuges of his relentlessly eventful life – painting and his country home, Chartwell.

The painting is a view “of Chartwell and its lakes showing the view in the background of the Kentish Weald that so attracted Churchill to purchase the house.” The original, painted circa 1938 on the eve of the Second World War, measures 36 x 24 inches and is held in The Studio at Chartwell by The National Trust. (see Coombs, Fig 103, C 286)

This lovely reproduction, one of 750 copies, is a “lithograph on cotton paper with serigraphy”. This copy is hand-numbered on the lower left blank margin “320/750” and hand-titled on the lower center blank margin “View from Chartwell”. At the lower right is a facsimile signature “Winston S. Churchill” and an embossed circular device reading “SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL TRUST AUTHENTIC LITHOGRAPH and dated “2005”. The image measures 24 x 16 inches (60.96 x 40.64 cm), preserving the aspect ratio of the original. The thick cotton paper stock on which the lithograph is rendered measures 26.75 x 19.75 inches (67.95 x 50.17 cm).

Condition is near fine, the image clean with no wear, soiling or fading, the only blemish a faint .75 inch (1.9 cm) indentation in the upper blank margin. An accompanying “Certificate of Authenticity” attests that the plate, stone, and screen used to produce the limited edition were destroyed thereafter.

On 9 September 1922, Winston’s wife, Clementine, "gave birth to their fifth child, a daughter whom they christened Mary. Also that day he bought a country house in Kent, Chartwell manor..." (Gilbert, A Life, p.450) Perhaps no physical place - not Blenheim Palace where Churchill was born, the Houses of Parliament where he served for six decades, 10 Downing Street where he twice resided as Prime Minister, or St. Paul's Cathedral where his Queen and leaders from around the world mourned his death - would more deeply affect Churchill's life and legacy.

At Chartwell, Churchill was by turns father, husband, painter, landscaper, and bricklayer and work on improving the house and gardens continued for much of Churchill’s life. Chartwell proved Churchill’s vital sanctuary during the “wilderness years” of the 1930s. And, of course, Chartwell served Churchill as “my factory” as he turned out an incredible volume of writing. Even during the darkest days of the Second World War, Chartwell was a place of refuge and renewal.

After the Second World War, Churchill's friend, Lord Camrose, assembled a consortium of benefactors to buy Chartwell, allowing Churchill to reside there for the rest of his life for a nominal rent. On Churchill’s death the property was given to the National Trust as a permanent memorial. Churchill did not leave Chartwell for the final time until mid-October 1964. Chartwell, with its more than 80 acres of woodland and farmland, remains a National Trust property, full of Churchill’s paintings and belongings, inhabited by his memory and spirit.

Churchill first took up painting during the First World War. May 1915 saw Churchill scapegoated for failure in the Dardanelles and slaughter at Gallipoli and forced from his Cabinet position at the Admiralty. By November 1915 Churchill was serving at the Front, leading a battalion in the trenches. But during the summer of 1915, as he battled depression, he rented Hoe Farm in Surrey, where he discovered an affinity and talent for painting. During the remaining half of his long life, he created more than 500 paintings. In so doing, he created for himself something restorative in the great and turbulent sweep of his otherwise tremendously public life. He wrote, "Painting is a friend who makes no undue demands, excites to no exhausting pursuits, keeps faithful pace even with feeble steps, and holds her canvas as a screen between us and the envious eyes of Time or the surly advance of Decrepitude" (Painting as a Pastime, p.13). Item #006247

Price: $525.00

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