Item #007291 The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor. Winston S. Churchill, the wartime Prime Minister's namesake grandson.
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor
The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor

The Great Republic: A History of America, inscribed by the editor

New York: Random House, 1999. First edition. Hardcover. This first edition is inscribed and dated by the editor, Prime Minister Winston S. Churchill's namesake grandson. The inscription, in blue ink in three lines on the blank recto of the leaf preceding the half title: "For John & Kathy | with best wishes | Winston S. Churchill". The book is described by the publisher as "Sir Winston Churchill's personal vision of American history, from the arrival of the first European settlers to the dawn of the Cold War." The text consists of selections from Churchill's A History of the English-Speaking Peoples as well as 24 articles and speeches.

Condition is near fine in a fine dust jacket. The binding is square, tight, and immaculate, with only trivial hints of shelf wear to extremities. The contents are nearly pristine, the deckled fore edges and bottom edges as immaculate as the interior of the book. Only the top edge of the text block shows mild soiling and spotting. The unclipped dust jacket is bright, clean, and complete. The dust jacket is protected in a removable, archival quality clear cover.

This book edited by Sir Winston Churchill’s namesake grandson encapsulates Churchill's informed and insightful observations on the history of America. The editor, Winston S. Churchill (1940-2010) was born the year his grandfather became wartime Prime Minister. The son of Randolph Churchill and Pamela Digby, he was a journalist, Tory Member of Parliament (1970-1997), and author.

The cultural commonality and vitality of English-speaking peoples animated Churchill throughout his life, from his Victorian youth in an ascendant British Empire to his twilight in the midst of the American century. Churchill, the child of an American mother and descended from British nobility on his father's side, paid particular heed to the 'special relationship' between Britain and the United States. Perhaps to some extent he regarded himself as a personification of that relationship. When Churchill first addressed the U.S. Congress on 26 December 1941 he famously quipped, "I cannot help reflecting that if my father had been American and my mother British, instead of the other way around, I might have got here on my own." Among the English-speaking peoples, Churchill considered Britain and the United states in particular "united by other ties besides those of State policy and public need." During his wartime speech at Harvard, among the "ties of blood and history" Churchill cited were, "Law, language, literature - these are considerable factors. Common conceptions of what is right and decent, a marked regard for fair play, especially to the weak and poor, a stern sentiment of impartial justice, and above all the love of personal freedom, or as Kipling put it: 'Leave to live by no man's leave underneath the law' - these are common conceptions on both sides of the ocean among the English-speaking peoples" (6 September 1943 speech at Harvard University). The reinforcement and constructive application of these common conceptions and common history - upon which so much of 20th Century history hinged - would continue to the very end of Churchill's life and career.

Reference: Cohen A301.1. Item #007291

Price: $150.00