Home Rule in a Nutshell. Winston S. Churchill.
Home Rule in a Nutshell
Home Rule in a Nutshell
Home Rule in a Nutshell
Home Rule in a Nutshell

Home Rule in a Nutshell

London: The Daily Chronicle, 1912. Paperback. This rare pamphlet publication represents itself as "A pocket book for speakers and electors, containing a brief exposition of the arguments for Home Rule, and answers to the objections raised." This third ("Revised and Enlarged") edition of 1912 is the first to contain an important 4-page introduction by Winston Churchill, lending his name, and influence to the cause. At the time of publication, Churchill served in the Cabinet as First Lord of the Admiralty. His four-page introduction is decisively favorable to the cause: "The facts and arguments collected in this brief epitome deserve the attention of fair-minded and patriotic Englishmen." Churchill frames the arguments in the pamphlet thus: "if they are favorable, what a sorry part will a man have played who out of carelessness, prejudice, or partisanship is guilty of obstructing a settlement earnestly desired by the Irish people, and politic and necessary in itself!" Churchill's family had supported unyielding British control over Ireland. His father, Lord Randolph Churchill, won political victories through his support of the Unionists in Ulster. Over time, Winston came to support Home Rule, spurred by the successful example of South Africa, where he had been so involved in his early career. On 8 February 1912 Winston spoke in Belfast in favor of Home Rule - the same Belfast where his father, Lord Randolph, famously opposed Home Rule, declaring in 1886 "Ulster will fight and Ulster will be right." Winston's 1912 reply: "Why cannot this great settlement be made? We have made friends with our enemies; can we not make friends with our comrades too?" This was a major and controversial event, involving extraordinary precautions to protect Churchill's physical safety from hostile crowds. The Home Rule crisis of 1912-1914 was sidelined by the outbreak of World War I. Nonetheless, Churchill would ultimately introduce the Irish Free State Bill, which won passage in 1922. The rare pamphlet publication offered here is a small but substantive publication. It is string-bound in paper wraps, measures 5.25 x 4 inches, and is thick for a pamphlet, with 92 pages of small, dense print. Churchill's introduction is prominently advertised on the front cover. Condition is very good indeed for an item of this age and fragility. The paper wraps are lightly soiled, but complete with no loses or tears and tightly bound, with the original string binding intact. The contents are lightly age-toned, but otherwise clean and tight. The only marking found is an ink-stamped previous owner name to the blank inside front cover. Bibliographic reference: Cohen B10.1. (Woods mentions only the later, fourth edition, as Woods B5). Near fine. Item #001614

Price: $900.00